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paul whiteman biography

He was awarded 2 Stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for Recording at 6157 Hollywood Boulevard and for Radio at 1601 Vine Street in Hollywood, California. Whiteman was surrounded by musical influences as a child.

Whiteman commissioned George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue and conducted its premiere at Aeolian Hall, New York City, in 1924, with the composer as piano soloist. After the war he moved to New York in 1920, where he recorded his first hit, Whispering/The Japanese Sandman. Although he is ignored or maligned by most jazz historians, Whiteman made considerable contributions to jazz, not only because of his orchestra’s enormous popularity. He came from a musical family: his father, Wilburforce James Whiteman was the supervisor of music for the Denver Public Schools, a position he held for fifty years, and his mother Elfrida (née Dallison) was a former opera singer. By signing up for this email, you are agreeing to news, offers, and information from Encyclopaedia Britannica. Articles from Britannica Encyclopedias for elementary and high school students. After Beiderbecke left the band in 1929 and Whiteman filmed the erratic but fascinating movie The King of Jazz in 1930, the Depression forced the bandleader to cut back on his personnel (which at one time included two pianos, tuba, bass sax, string bass, banjo, and guitar in its rhythm section).

He enlisted in the Navy during World War I, and his musical abilities resulted in the Navy putting him in charge of his own band. Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

Whiteman was born in Denver, Colorado, United States. Whiteman’s father used to lock young Paul in the house sewing room with his violin to make him practice, but his son rebelled by smashing the instrument to pieces. Paul Whitemanpromoted himself as 'king of jazz' and promoted his music as 'symphonic jazz'.

Red Nichols and Tommy Dorsey passed through the band but it was in 1927, with the addition of Bix Beiderbecke, Frankie Trumbauer, and Bing Crosby (the latter originally featured as part of a vocal trio called the Rhythm Boys), that Whiteman began to finally have an important jazz band. Read Full Biography. Britannica Quiz. In 1918, he organized his first dance band in San Francisco and, after short periods in Los Angeles and Atlantic City, he settled in New York in 1920. Although his orchestra in the 1930s at times featured Bunny Berigan, Trumbauer, and both Jack and Charlie Teagarden, Whiteman's music was considered old hat by the time of the swing era and he essentially retired (except for special appearances) by the early '40s. His father, Wilberforce Whiteman, was a supervisor of music in the Denver public school system, and his mother and sister were vocalists. Corrections? Jazz violinist of the 1920s & '30s whose star-studded outifts set the tone for the onrushing big band era. He would put together his band every so often during that period, and in the early 1960s they even managed to secure engagements in Las Vegas, after which Whiteman retired. Many of his recordings (particularly those with Beiderbecke) have been reissued numerous times and are more rewarding than his detractors would lead one to believe. In reality much of his music was more popular and dance band oriented, but he did lean toward a semi-classical style. Bing Crosby got his start with Whiteman in 1929, in a trio called the Rhythm Boys. Paul Whiteman (March 28, 1890 – December 29, 1967) was a popular American orchestral leader. After a stint with the Navy, he formed his own dance orchestra in 1919 and went on to sell millions of records in the early 1920s featuring hits lik…

Publicity Listings He hired the best white jazz players, but he allowed little room for improvisation in his arrangements and greatly simplified jazz rhythms. The case of Whiteman, though completely different, is almost equally important, and certainly Whiteman was of enormous influence. His father, Dr. Wilburforce Whiteman, was a prominent musician and music teacher in the Denver, Colorado area. Whiteman, who was originally a violinist, conducted a 40-piece U.S. Navy band in 1917–18 and then developed a hotel orchestra in California, which he took to New York City in 1920. Originally a classically trained violinist, Paul Whiteman led a large Navy band during World War I and always had a strong interest in the popular music of the day.

He was nominated for the 2014 New Jersey Hall of Fame in the Arts and the Entertainment Category.

In the 1970s, Dick Sudhalter for a time organized and led "the New Paul Whiteman Orchestra" which recorded a couple of fine recreation records. Jazz violinist of the 1920s & '30s whose star-studded outifts set the tone for the onrushing big band era. In 1966, he admitted that, A legendary judge of talent, Whiteman's discoveries over the years included.

After the war he moved to New York in 1920, where he recorded his first hit, Whispering/The Japanese Sandman. He was successful as a cocomposer of popular songs during the 1920s and led his orchestra in Broadway musicals.

Actually, his orchestra was the most popular during the era and at times (despite its size) it did play very good jazz; perhaps "King of the Jazz Age" would have been a better title. Omissions? Whiteman's band continued its run into the 1930s, but toward the end of the decade their popularity began to wane, and in the early 1940s Whiteman took a job as musical director for the American Broadcasting Co., a position he kept into the '60s. The Rhapsody became Whiteman’s theme, and he established the Whiteman Awards for compositions in a “symphonic jazz” style. The 1930 film King of Jazz was the first of four in which his orchestra appeared. After a start as a classical violinist and violist, Whiteman then led a jazz-influenced dance band which became locally popular in San Francisco, California in 1918. frankfob2@yahoo.com, Other Works He was born in Denver, Colorado. Announcing our NEW encyclopedia for Kids! Whiteman was the host of several national radio programs during the 1930s, wrote three books (Jazz, with Mary Margaret McBride, 1926; How To Be a Bandleader, with Leslie Lieber, 1941; Records for the Millions, 1948), and recorded extensively. More important, Whiteman explored hitherto uninvestigated…. | 

Joe Venuti and Eddie Lang soon joined up, and many of Whiteman's recordings of 1927-1930 (particularly the ones with Bill Challis arrangements) are among his finest.

Originally a classically trained violinist, Paul Whiteman led a large Navy band during World War I and always had a strong interest in the popular music of the day.

As a teenager he played first viola in the Denver Symphony Orch… Trumpeter Henry Busse (featured on "Hot Lips" and "When Day Is Done") was Whiteman's main star during the 1921-1926 period. Let us know if you have suggestions to improve this article (requires login). Paul Whiteman began his musical career as a viola player for the San Francisco Symphony. Updates? Whiteman was born to a vocalist mother and music supervisor in Colorado in 1890. In 1924 he introduced the George Gershwin classic Rhapsody in Blue, which became the band's signature song. In 1918, he organized his first dance band in San Francisco and, after short periods in Los Angeles and Atlantic City, he settled in New York in 1920. In 1924 he presented George Gershwin performing “Rhapsody in Blue” in a landmark concert in New York. Paul Whiteman, (born March 28, 1890, Denver, Colorado, U.S.—died December 29, 1967, Doylestown, Pennsylvania, U.S.), American bandleader, called the “King of Jazz” for popularizing a musical style that helped to introduce jazz to mainstream audiences during the 1920s and 1930s. His popularity waned in the late 1940s, but he came back as a television-series host in the 1950s and occasionally led bands up to the time of his death. His father insisted that Paul learn an instrument, preferably the violin, but the young man chose the viola. |  Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree.... Paul Whiteman with Hildegarde Loretta Sell on his ABC radio program. Paul Whiteman, (born March 28, 1890, Denver, Colorado, U.S.—died December 29, 1967, Doylestown, Pennsylvania, U.S.), American bandleader, called the “King of Jazz ” for popularizing a musical style that helped to introduce jazz to mainstream audiences during the 1920s and 1930s.

Whiteman also introduced the Grand Canyon Suite (1931) by Ferde Grofé, who had arranged the Rhapsody. It sold more than two million copies, making Whiteman was an instant star. Seeking to "make a lady out of jazz," Whiteman's symphonic jazz did not always swing, but at Aeolian Hall in 1924 he introduced "Rhapsody in Blue" (with its composer George Gershwin on piano) in what was called "An Experiment in Modern Music."

Favorite characters or titles based on hit songs, or visa-versa, of the same name. Paul Whiteman began his musical career as a viola player for the San Francisco Symphony. According to Chris Popa, Whiteman was Protestant and of Scottish, Irish, English, and Dutch ancestry, although he is listed … View agent, publicist, legal and company contact details on IMDbPro, Great dance routines are a thing of beauty are a joy forever. Whiteman had the foresight to hire some of the best jazz musicians of the era, including Red Nichols, Frankie Trumbauer, Tommy Dorsey and Bix Beiderbecke. Official Sites, Co-founded Capitol Records in 1942, along with songwriter/film producer, Unlike many of his contemporaries, he always kept an open, and enthusiastic, mind about what was going on in the music world. Whiteman was also a star of radio and the subject of a film, The King of Jazz (1930). His students included future big-band legend. He enlisted in the Navy during World War I, and his musical abilities resulted in the Navy putting him in charge of his own band. - IMDb Mini Biography By:

Spotlight on Musical Groups.

Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. Jazz is the folk music of the Industrial Age. He actually began his career as a violist with the San Francisco Symphony. He married four times: first to Miss Jimmy Smith, then to Nellie Stack in 1908, then to Mildred Vanderhoff in 1922, and then to Margaret Livingston in 1931. His initial recordings ("Japanese Sandman" and "Whispering") were such big sellers that Whiteman was soon a household name.

Because press agents dubbed him "The King of Jazz" in the 1920s, Paul Whiteman has always been considered a controversial figure in jazz history. Inducted into the Big Band and Jazz Hall of Fame in 1993. His superior dance band used some of the most technically skilled musicians of the era in a versatile show that included everything from pop tunes and waltzes to semi-classical works and jazz. Whiteman later bought himself a viola and then revealed a genuine musical talent. Although his style began to lose favor in the ‘30s, he continued to guest conduct, had his own television show, and served as music director of ABC.

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